Thursday, 14 November 2019

On The Problem of Evil

Diamonds are not forever, but evil is. Evil cannot be abolished. There can never be a society that is free of evil because all men (even the saintly ones) have the potential for being evil, just as they have the potential for being good. But this philosophical point is ignored by the modern leftists, liberals, and the neo-conservatives who are convinced that a society free of evil (a paradise) can be created through reason. They inflict utopian policies on their nation and launch wars for creating a paradise in other nations. Most of them are atheists, but they have a “blind faith” in reason; they are convinced that their domestic and foreign policy is perfect.

2 comments:

Terrekain said...

I would tweak this to say that the Problem of Evil is not the concept of "Abolition" itself, but the false Premise presented by orators of "Abolition".

"If it can't be beaten, do nothing."

This false choice which focuses on "Abolition" and "Inevitability" attempts to override the Real-Life experience of trade-offs; of Greater Goods and Lesser Evils.

It is on the same order as the "inevitability" con, convincing others that something cannot be "avoided" and presenting them the false choice of surrender and apathy - it is a choice method to short-circuit inquiry, reason, remedy, and feedback. It is also used on oneself to provide an escapist rationale to quit at something.

"{Evil} is inevitable, so stop fighting {Evil}."

Fill in the {} with your choice. Criminals, Terrorists and Socialists have all made liberal use of this tactic.

What breaks the phony Premise, of course, is a simple inspection of trade-offs and alternatives. Real "Choice", after all, is not between a Utopia and Capitalist America, but between Scottsdale and what is becoming an evermore Socialist Phoenix in Arizona.

Anoop Verma said...

@ Terrekain good point. This is another way of looking at this problem. I think particular evils can be dealt with in there are enough resources. However, in this post I am referring to the problem of evil as a whole, as the sense of a concept. I mean that the problem of evil as a concept is something that cannot be abolished.